When you give a mouse a cookie!

In  Mrs. G’s First Grade they are reading some books by Laura Numeroff about a mouse that likes cookies and goes to school!

The mouse does the same things at school that we do. He eats lunch, plays soccer, and eats cookies! He also reads books and does hard math problems.

He makes such a mess at the science experiment table that he must take a bath in the school bathroom.

We made our own books with sentences and here we are with a picture of the mouse that we drew and colored ourselves.

We hope you like our drawings!

Mrs. G – 1st Grade

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Question of the Day

2nd grade is now deep into the curriculum and the “honeymoon stage” of the first couple of weeks has worn off.  Things are starting to get busy and the pressures mount to get everything done and pack learning into the day.  While this stress may have good intentions behind it, it is important for teachers and parents alike to remember to slow down and take time for what is actually important, not just what we think is important.  For Mrs. Morner’s class, this includes spending positive moments together as a class.

Mrs. Morner has created “Question of the Day.”  It is a simple presentation filled with simple questions, but the result has been wonderful.

In addition to beginning our morning with the pledges, a devotion, and prayer, we now also open with the “Question of the Day,” which ranges from questions as common as “What is your favorite food?” and as creative as “If you were given 1,000 acres of land, what would you do with it?”  None of the questions are academic (on purpose) and it has so far allowed everyone to start the day in a relaxed way that also allows knowing each other better as a class.  It’s a period of five minutes where students can talk about their interests and use their imagination a bit.  It opens us up on a positive note and reminds us that, while the day may get busy and our work is incredibly important, spending some time together as a class is just as important and we can still make some time for the fun stuff too!

Mrs. Morner, 2nd grade

Five Bags

QOTD

Beating the “HEAT” in Physical Education.

Ever wonder how the kids make it through a Physical Education class during the month of September?  Well, here are our strategies on how we BEAT THE HEAT..

When focusing on the goal of each class engaging in vigorous activity, we must take into consideration the weather for that day.  For example, currently grades 6-8 are engaged in Volleyball (girl’s) and Soccer (boy’s), both activities require a lot of effort, movement and engagement while being outside in the sun for a considerable amount of time.  In order to combat the heat of the day, we use 3 simple strategies:

 Strategy 1: Hydration:  Encouraging students to bring their own water bottle or hydro flask to P.E. is a must.  We teach students to moderate their water intake. Students are given frequent water breaks to make sure that we our doing our best to stay hydrated through the class period.

Strategy #2: Short Activity Bursts:  Skill development and drills are timed, and set to maximize output through shorter activities.  Our goal during these hot days is to figure out how to get the most opportunity for each student to grow through participation, while being mindful of the importance of breaking for hydration and some quick time in the shade. For example, rather than working out for 20 minutes before a water break, we cut it down to every 5-7minutes.

Strategy #3: Education: We take the time to educate the students about the importance of proper hydration throughout each day.  That water consumption should be regular and balanced to keep their body hydrated. Remember, if you are feeling thirsty, your body is telling you that it has already entered a state of dehydration.  Preloading your body with water consumption is just like filling up your gas tank in your car before a long trip. You would never start that road trip with your fuel light flashing, yet we regularly see kids start their activities while already thirsty. A great formula for daily water consumption for the average person is to take your body weight, divide it by two and that number is how many ounces of water you should consume daily. For example, 200lbs divided by 2 equals 100, so at that weight, the average person should consume 100oz of water per day.

So as you can see, with these three strategies in place, we are able to run an educational yet vigorous physical education program; while maintaining proper hydration to help with success for students battling the heat.

Mr. Harrison, 6-8 grade Physical Education Department


COUNSELOR’S CORNER – August 2019 Edition: A MESSAGE FROM MISS DOYLE

“Life is Like a Comic”

When growing up, one of my favorite days of the year was my first day back to school after summer break. A new school year meant a clean slate, vibrant Lisa Frank folders, a pencil pouch filled with brand new gel pens, and of course a first day of school outfit that my parents needed to film from every angle.

As your student begins another school year at St. John’s, I ask you to ponder the following statement from Kid President himself, “Life is a like a comic”. Comic strips are made-up of a variety of boxes; each box telling a story connected to the box that comes before it and follows after it. And, just like I am asking your student(s) this week, let me ask you, what does your comic look like? Who are the main characters in your story? How do those people affect your life and how do you affect theirs? What conversations are being had from one word bubble to another? Are you taking bold chances in your comic or letting those courageous moments pass you by?

As the 2019-2020 school year begins, I encourage you to hold tight to our theme verse from Joshua 1:9. “Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged, for the Lord your God will be with you wherever you go.” The beginning of the year can be a mix of emotions, but the Lord has placed your family at St. John’s for a reason and at the right time. Hold tight, stay strong, take bold chances with God at the center of your story and teach your student to do the same.

As your student continues to write their own comic, and as you continue to write your own as well, know that the faculty and staff at St. John’s are here to play an important role in your story. That may be the role of teacher, coach, administrator, pastor, nurse, and the list goes on. No matter the role we may play in your story, know we are here to support your student and your family.

So, remember, “Life is like a comic”. May God bless each piece of your comic strip as your own story continues to be written, and as your student’s story continues to be written as well.

Kid President + Peanuts | Life is like a comic-  https://youtu.be/u5vClAseXBk

Blessings on the school year ahead,

Sara Doyle

St. John’s School Counselor

The 29th Annual St. John’s Student Leadership Retreat

Every summer, two weeks before the upcoming school year begins,  twenty-four 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students from the St. John’s Lutheran School Student Leadership Team attend an on-campus “retreat.”  The morning sessions of August 5th, 2019 provided this year’s team the opportunity to plan, prepare and strategize for the major events it will host for the upcoming school year, including:

      • Spring Spirit Week planning
      • Packaging 75 Open House “Survival Kits” for the incoming 6th graders
      • Habit of Mind presentation training with Mr. Mercier

 

  • Habitudes (Images that Form Leadership Habits and Attitudes) training with Mr. Mercier

 

    • Peer Counseling training with Miss Doyle
    • Life Group Leader training with Mrs. VB
    • Shepherding instructions with Mr. Stuewe

After eating lunch with Dr. Hollatz,  Mrs. VB was gracious enough to host a team building pool party at her house.  This gave our Student Leaders an opportunity to get to know each other in a fun, safe, encouraging environment.

The St. John’s Student Leadership Team is excited to serve our schools student body, our congregation and community.  What a blessing it is to have such a dedicated group of students and teachers who want to make a positive difference in the lives of so many people during the 2019-2020 school year.

By: Mr. Nathan Mercier, 6th grade, Student Leadership

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Peru Project – Part II

In part 1 I outlined this project which St. John’s students have been supporting for the past 9 years.
Once my wife, Patty, and I have a list of projects our work begins. One of the major projects we wanted to take on was quickly started:  the awning to cover the space between the two classrooms.
The biggest consideration was where the awning would be of most benefit. The next was timing:  how to get the structure built and the awning made so that both would be done before we leave in July.  Two different people are needed, a carpenter and an awning maker.  The last consideration was that the entire structure needed to be done in such a way that it can be unassembled and moved when the government comes through with the funds to remodel the school. This could be as early as this September or up to several years.
Lola wanted the space between the two largest classrooms covered. (See the first picture.)  This decided we then began to work on how to best coordinate structure with awning.  The carpenter gave us a time frame for completion just before we were to leave Perú. That meant the awning person would have to work from dimensions given by the carpenter rather than taken from the actual structure. This is risky at best. In the end we decided to have the carpenter build a structure the same size as the structure covering the play structure. (See picture #2)  to our amazement these dimensions fit almost perfectly into the desired space. And even better: because the two structures will be identical it will allow  Lola to design the space in the new school around the shade structures, placing  them end-to-end. It will add continuity in the long-run.
This decision also allowed the awning person to take more accurate measurements from the existent awning for the new awning. We took bids from several awning makers and chose the one who offered quality and the best price. It would cost about $850 for a high quality, water/weather proof material made to special order and installed.  About a week later we returned from a short trip to Cajamarca to find the rolled up cover (photo #3) hand delivered and ready to installed when the carpenter finished his work.  It weighs about 300 lbs.
The carpenter was called and came to the school to get the measurements for the awning structure. We agreed on a price (about $1500 equivalent in national money: Soles) and we went to Trujillo to exchange dollars. (Picture 4 shows the structure being put in place.) While there we went to a local store called Sodimac to see if they had prefabricated shelves the size we wanted. Sodimac is a Homedepot-like store which recently has come to Trujillo. While convenient it doesn’t offer a lot in terms of shelving. Nothing we could find fit the dimensions needed.  We wanted to steer clear of donating something which would just be makeshift. The units we did see were expensive and low quality.
So we began looking for plan B.  A family member recommended a young man in the town who had recently built some cabinets for a local restaurant. The young man’s name is Meikel and he works with a material he calls melamine, a kind of particle board covered in formica-like material. He could build sturdy shelves to the dimensions we wanted at less cost than the prefabricated odd-sized units we had looked at.  It did mean more footwork for us, but assured something which will endure the hard use they will receive, while adding uniformity to the classrooms.
The photos 5 and 6 show Meikel, the handy man, constructing the five shelves in our living room. It took he and his wife two days to put them together and they looked great.
Part three:  going shopping for things on the wish list.

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Peru Project Update!

The Perú project is well under way. For those who dont know, the students at St. John’s have been supporting a small preschool in the coastal town of Las Delicias, Peru for the past 9 years. The school provides education to the poorest children in the small town.   The significant impact these donations have had over the years can be viewed here:
http://perunuevaesperanza.weebly.com/donacion-2017.html
This year we arrived at the school on June 14th, 2019 to determine how we could best help the school.  The fund had over $7,000 which was raised over the past several years by SJLS students. We hoped to do something with technology for the students, and as well to replace the awning structure donated by St. John’s 8 years ago. This original structure was only to be temporary and outlasted our expectations considerably.  Being made of metal the ocean breeze has eaten away at the structure and awning. We planned to replace it with a wooden structure. The first picture shows the original awning and it’s poor state of condition.
The present principal is a real go-getter.  Since the beginning of her time at the school she has recognized the importance of St. John’s donations and has done her part to meet expectations.  All of this can be seen in the video link given above.  The principal, Lola Kong, let us know that the best technological support we could give would be large screen televisions with USB ports. They have free access to educational videos. This seemed a very viable way we could help. As seen in the second photo, far left, the television for the 5 year olds is small and ineffective.
As well, Lola expressed the desire to have a series of shelves,  all of the same size and color to replace the makeshift shelves used around the classrooms. (see the third photo) These makeshift shelves have served a purpose but not being made for storing things, they were second best.
And finally Lola gave us a “wish” list of items they could really use:  dolls for the children to play with (see video link mentioned above—at the very end), as well as puzzles, musical instruments, costumes (firefighter, police, nurse/doctor, carpenter), hand puppets, a First Aid box, megaphone (for emergency drills), basketballs, volleyball, soccer balls, cones for PE, curtains for the 5 year old classroom, play kitchen sets, magnifying glasses, rulers, plastic chairs for adults (12 for parent meetings) and PE/emergency whistles to name a few.
Patty, my wife, and I had our work cut out for us. In my next installment I will show the progress being made.
Doug Stone, Spanish Teacher grades 7-8
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