Spanish Language Proficiency at St. John’s

By: Senor Stone, 7/8th Grade Spanish Teacher

I’m excited to share results from last year’s benchmark Spanish proficiency testing.  A group of 8th graders (25 total) self-selected to take the Avant STAMP4s test.  (STAMP stands for Standards-Based Measure of Proficiency).  This test is a recognized reliable and valid tool which measures language proficiency based on our World Standards and the ACTFL guidelines.  The test measures proficiency in Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking.  It gives results which compare our students to thousands of students across the country and gives feedback to teachers as to the effectiveness of the methods they use to teach.  

Last year’s test group was special.  Due to changes in schedule, I had them for about 60 hours more than previous group.  Most of the groups take the test at 180 hours.   This group took the test at about 240 hours of instruction (that’s the equivalent in hours of Spanish 1 and Spanish 2 in high school. As well, this group is the first to have participated in Silent Sustained Reading for two years. 

The results were striking.  The group mean, across all four skills, was a 4.45.  The Avant company correlates a 4.45 to about 520 hours of study (comparing with students across the country).  That is almost double the amount of time this St. John’s 8th grade group had.  We had two students achieve a score of 5 in each of the four areas tested (at least 650 hours of study normally) qualifying them for the Global Seal of Biliteracy Functional Level (side note: the Global Seal is rigorous.  They require proof of proficiency in both languages and only accept specific, reliable tests.  STAMP4s is one, The College Board AP test is another.  The Functional level Global Seal is considered the equivalent of an AP 3 pass).  There were an additional 10 students who came within one or two points from qualifying for their Global Seals.    

Most significantly, these students achieved this level of proficiency without using a commercial book, without being given traditional grammar explanations (using linguistic terms such as preterit, imperfect, etc.—the AP doesn’t expect students know these terms).  As well they did no verb conjugation charts and did not fill in any vocabulary/grammar worksheets.  They did not take a single multiple-choice quiz.  How did they do it?  Simple: following the principles of proficiency and language acquisition research.  Students are given opportunities each day to interact with the language by focusing on content which is at least 90% comprehensible to them.  I work hard to keep the content engaging and repetitive in novel ways.  The repetition came from focusing on a limited amount of vocabulary and verbs from lists of the most frequently used words.  Because our brains are hard-wired to acquire language through story, the engaging contexts took the form of story co-creation with students.  The oral stories are linked to written stories which are in multiple versions designed to push their level higher with each version. Production activities (speaking and writing) are designed to help students to use circumlocution to make themselves understood.  The program is rounded out by Silent Sustained Reading (SSR) using novels based on most frequent words.

A shift from the outdated and inefficient grammar scope and sequences used in some high schools is taking place around the country.  The Denver Public School system shifted completely to proficiency teaching about 10 years ago and enjoy 92% pass rates on the AP tests.  Most of those students score 4 and 5 and never learned the linguistic terms “preterit, imperfect, etc” and did no motivation killing grammar worksheets!  If this interests you and you’d like to hear the expert’s opinions about what is going on in Spanish class at St. John’s and in other departments around the California and the country, I am attaching a link to a video.  It is one of the clearest examples of how the choice of method can make all the difference in the world.  You don’t have to watch the entire hour.  The first 20 minutes gets to the heart of what I am talking about here (and if your time is really limited, start at 4:00 minutes and stop at 18:00 minutes.)

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Spanish Language Testing Success!

I’m excited to share good news with all of you.  Once again, a group of 8th graders (25 total) took the Avant STAMP4s test.  (STAMP stands for Standards-Based Measure of Proficiency.  It basically is a highly reliable and valid test which measures language proficiency through our World Standards and the ACTFL guidelines.  The test measures proficiency in Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking.  It gives results which compare our students to thousands of students across the country and gives feedback to teachers as to the effectiveness of the methods they use to teach.

This year’s test group is special in a number of ways.  They are the first group who have studied for 250 hours at St. John’s.  Most of the groups take the test at 180 hours.   As well, this group is the first to have participated in Silent Sustained Reading for two years.  The group self-selected and as such was a good representation of the class on the whole.

The results?  I couldn’t be more proud and grateful.  They all did wonderfully.  The group mean, across all four skills, was a 4.45.  The Avant company correlates a 4.45 to about 520 hours of study (comparing with students across the country).  That is almost double the amount of time this St. John’s 8th grade group.  We had two students achieve a score of 5 in each of the four areas tested (at least 650 hours of study normally) qualifying them for the Global Seal of Biliteracy Functional Level (side note: the Global Seal is rigorous.  They require proof of proficiency in both languages and only accept specific, reliable tests, STAMP is one, a College Board AP score of 3—a low pass for this level—is another).  There were an additional 10 students who are close to this level.

Most significantly, these students achieved this level of proficiency without using a commercial book, without being given traditional grammar explanations, without ever conjugating verbs, without ever filling in a single worksheet, or taking a single multiple-choice quiz.  How did they do it?  Well, this group has been special since the beginning.  They dove into the method we use at St. John’s.   They took seriously the information given to them about how acquisition occurs and had fun with all the rest.  We always try to keep class light and fun—but 90% in understandable Spanish—and they took this idea and ran with it.  We started with very simple words (all taken from lists of most commonly used words in daily speech), which were then used in engaging contexts.  Because our brains are hard-wired to acquire language through story, the engaging contexts took the form of story co-creation with students.  Very shortly they began to read those stories in versions which push their level higher.  Once completed, the cycle of oral co-created story followed by multiple version reading repeated. This was always done with a few new words in a different context.  As such, common every day useful words were recycled a lot.  As soon as they were ready, we then added chapter book reading—both read on their own, and together as a group.    At every step I tried to find situations in which would give them the opportunity to use all this new vocabulary to talk about their favorite subjects:  themselves.

If this interests you and you’d like to hear the expert’s opinions about what is going on in Spanish class at St. John’s, I am attaching a link to a video.  It is one of the clearest and most dramatic examples of how the choice of method can make all the difference in the world.  You don’t have to watch the entire hour.  The first 20 minutes gets to the heart of what I am talking about here (and if your time is really limited, start at 4:00 minutes and stop at 18:00 minutes.)

https://youtu.be/illApgaLgGA

8th grade spanish test 18th grade spanish test 2

Read Across America Day 

Last Monday, March 2nd, we celebrated Read Across America Day. Our day was filled with lots of fun STEM type activities to help us connect with some of our favorite Dr. Seuss books. Dr. Hollatz started us off by reading The Foot Booksince we were all wearing crazy socks. We practiced skip counting to find out the number of girls’, boys’, and adults’ feet we have in our class. We talked about taking care of our earth after we read The Loraxthen balanced pom poms on top of Truffula trees we’d made. Fair treatment for all was our topic after hearing Yertle the Turtlethen stacked as many turtles as we could. Everyone had a chance to work together to stack 100 read cups to represent a giant hat after we read The Cat in the Hat. We ended our special day with two cool gifts to take home. Everyone got to choose a Dr. Seuss eraser and pencil! Oh the thinks you can think!! 

By: Mrs. Cook, 1st Grade

From sea to shining sea, American schools celebrated “Read Across America”  this week.  St. John’s Lutheran School was no exception.  In every classroom, teachers discussed their own favorite, age-appropriate books during informal book talks.  Students, therefore, were exposed to unfamiliar books, prompting many to jot down titles and authors on cards provided by their teachers. Teachers also provided a “free reading” period of time in their teaching schedules, further emphasizing the enjoyment and creative stimulation that reading for pleasure can provide.  Students gratefully took advantage of their teachers’ gift of reading time.

By far, the favorite part of our SJLS “Read Across America” activities was the costume choice that many students (and some brave teachers!) made to honor a favorite literary character.  The halls were filled with min-Harry Potters, junior-Where’s Waldos, and faux-Dr. Seuss characters.  Discussions and laughter overflowed on campus, as students attempted to guess their peers’ literary characters.

Students focused on reading.  People wore costumes.  Laughter erupted.  All told, the day was a complete success. Oh, the places we went!

By: Mr. Smith, 7th grade

Ask…Imagine… Plan…Create…Improve! 6th Grade Engineers!

Recently, our 6th graders dove into the Engineering Design Process. Each student individually took on the challenge of designing and building an insulating device that can hold 200mL of hot water and trap the most heat for 20 minutes. To prepare for this challenge, the students studied the transfer of heat, differentiated between insulators and conductors, and researched good household materials to use as insulators.

Once the research and designs were created, it was time to build their devices! Each student built their own unique design and tested it. Once they tested their device the 6th graders had the opportunity to analyze their trial one data, reflect on the effectiveness of their design, and modify their thermos for a second trial! 

To reflect on the whole Engineering Design Process from start to finish, the students wrote a personal narrative to add to their middle school writing portfolio. They published their narrative on Flipgrid and had the opportunity to encourage one another by commenting on each other’s videos. 

Whew! Our 6th graders worked hard to sharpen their 21st Century skills as they thought critically, used creativity to design and build their thermos, collaborated with others, and communicated their experiences with the engineering design process!

By: Yvette Stuewe, Middle School Science