When you give a mouse a cookie!

In  Mrs. G’s First Grade they are reading some books by Laura Numeroff about a mouse that likes cookies and goes to school!

The mouse does the same things at school that we do. He eats lunch, plays soccer, and eats cookies! He also reads books and does hard math problems.

He makes such a mess at the science experiment table that he must take a bath in the school bathroom.

We made our own books with sentences and here we are with a picture of the mouse that we drew and colored ourselves.

We hope you like our drawings!

Mrs. G – 1st Grade

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Rockin’ Recorders!

Third graders were rockin’ the last week of school at their “Rockin’ Recorder” concert!  This concert culminated their year of recorder lessons in music class.  In class, students learned how to read music, play a wind instrument, work together as a group, and persevere as they play the recorder.  They also take part in the “Recorder Karate” program, as they earn different colored “belts” that wrap around their recorder.  They enjoyed showing off the belts they have earned based on the different songs they have learned and mastered.  Parents, families, 2nd graders, and 1st graders were in the audience to listen to their progress.  The younger students are now looking forward to third grade so they can play the recorder, too!  Third graders now have a great foundation to build upon as they are given the opportunity to join band in fourth grade and also play the ukulele in fourth grade music class.  We love our “Rockin’ Recorders” and the third graders who play them!

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Tide Pool Fun and Learning!

The 5th grade students and teachers wrapped up their school year by exploring the tide pools at Little Corona Beach.  Before going to explore the 5th graders studied what the tide pools are made of and the different types of animals that can be found in the tide pools.  After visiting the tide pools, the students had to use the information they learned from the field trip to create an animal that they thought would be perfectly adapted to live in the tide pools. The students also wrote a haiku to describe what they experienced on their trip and to summarize their learning.

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Rainy Days and PE…What to do?

This year was quite the year for rain.  With so many rainy days, it can be very easy to lose the interest of students during a Physical Education period.  This situation entices a teacher to be creative, spontaneous, and most importantly find an activity that the kids have never tried before.

This year, the middle schoolers were introduced to a few amazing and creative ways to get exercise, even when locked inside for days at a time.  Two favorites stood out, Tic-Tac-Toe relay and Opposites Race.

Tic-Tac-Toe Relay is taking a classic and putting a big twist on it.  First you tape the traditional grid on the floor, the you set students in teams, and hand out colored bean bags.  Let the fun begin, the students get to sprint, dive, and slide to put their bean bag where they want it to go. The students have a ton of fun and really enjoy the exercise through friendly competition.

Next is Opposite Race:  It sets up to be so simple… yet so confusing.  Fun for 25-80 students, this game incorporates quick muscle reflexes (type 2 muscles) and the ability to listen and process directions before doing the opposite. What a blast to watch the students sprint the wrong way, laugh and have fun with each other, with no hard feelings.  The best part was watching all the kids cheer for their peers who made the finals. What a great game for a rainy day.

Success…for sure!!!

Mr. Harrison, 8th grade

Math Carnival

Step right up! Come one, come all to the 7th grade Probability Carnival! The seventh grade math students have been busy as we wind down to the end of the school year. We have been in our probability unit discussing the difference between simple and compound probability. To help the concepts sink in more deeply we finished our unit with some project based learning.The students first needed to brainstorm ideas for their own games that were based on probability and not skill. From there they had to calculate and compare the theoretical and experimental probabilities of their games. What better way to test out their probability than to host a carnival for the school! The STEM Lab was filled with dice and spinners, candy and bubbles, and lots of learning. And oh boy was fun had by all!

Ms. Forrest, Middle School Teacher, 7th and 8th grade math

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Got Energy?

Our 7th graders do! This past week they have been conducting labs to see the impact of height and mass on the amount of potential energy stored in an object. Understanding that to calculate the potential energy of an object you multiply the mass times the gravitational acceleration (9.8m/s) times the height, they first isolated the height of the drop of a ball as an independent variable. They dropped a tennis ball from 50cm, 75cm, and 100cm then recorded the height of the bounce. After the collection of their data, they used their information to calculate the potential energy and analyzed their data to draw a conclusion on the impact of the height of the drop on the amount of potential energy.

Next, the 7th graders decided to isolate the mass of the object as the independent variable and designed another experiment. This time they dropped a tennis ball, ping-pong ball, and golf ball from 100 cm and measured the height of the bounce. Again, they analyzed the data, calculated the potential energy, and drew conclusions.  Their 21st Century Skills were put to the task as they thought critically, created an experiment, collaborated with their lab partners, and communicated their results! Way to go, 7th Grade!!

By: Yvette Stuewe, MS Science

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St. John’s Wins First Place in the 53rd Annual California Student Media Festival!

View award winning video by student Paul Schulteis https://youtu.be/Bm-d-onb1g8

After completing our social studies unit on Medieval Europe, students in the seventh-grade were tasked with demonstrating their understanding of the role of a medieval manor by constructing a feudal manor using Minecraft. Minecraft allows students an opportunity to work on mathematics, visual arts, storytelling and digital learning in an engaging environment. Some students gain their first experience learning how to code while others continue to hone and advance their coding ability.

Class time was given to students to design their manor. Some students used iPads and others used their laptops. Once the Minecraft design was created students then had to record a four-minute video explaining what life on a manor was like. Many students added a final touch by incorporating medieval music to their video.

The projects the students turned in this year were amazing and needed to be viewed by others.I choose to submit several student projects into the 53rd California Student Media Festival (CSMF) competition. Student Paul Schulteis ended up winning in the middle school division of Curricular Humanities. His storytelling, creativity, and technical expertise designated him as the winner of this category. Paul and his project won St. John’s $250.00 to put toward future technology school projects. Technology is evolving everyday and having a state-of-the-art STEM lab allows our students to explore, build and create so that they have an opportunity to develop a passion for science, technology, engineering and math.

By Angie Bender, Middle School Teacher