Peru Project – Part II

In part 1 I outlined this project which St. John’s students have been supporting for the past 9 years.
Once my wife, Patty, and I have a list of projects our work begins. One of the major projects we wanted to take on was quickly started:  the awning to cover the space between the two classrooms.
The biggest consideration was where the awning would be of most benefit. The next was timing:  how to get the structure built and the awning made so that both would be done before we leave in July.  Two different people are needed, a carpenter and an awning maker.  The last consideration was that the entire structure needed to be done in such a way that it can be unassembled and moved when the government comes through with the funds to remodel the school. This could be as early as this September or up to several years.
Lola wanted the space between the two largest classrooms covered. (See the first picture.)  This decided we then began to work on how to best coordinate structure with awning.  The carpenter gave us a time frame for completion just before we were to leave Perú. That meant the awning person would have to work from dimensions given by the carpenter rather than taken from the actual structure. This is risky at best. In the end we decided to have the carpenter build a structure the same size as the structure covering the play structure. (See picture #2)  to our amazement these dimensions fit almost perfectly into the desired space. And even better: because the two structures will be identical it will allow  Lola to design the space in the new school around the shade structures, placing  them end-to-end. It will add continuity in the long-run.
This decision also allowed the awning person to take more accurate measurements from the existent awning for the new awning. We took bids from several awning makers and chose the one who offered quality and the best price. It would cost about $850 for a high quality, water/weather proof material made to special order and installed.  About a week later we returned from a short trip to Cajamarca to find the rolled up cover (photo #3) hand delivered and ready to installed when the carpenter finished his work.  It weighs about 300 lbs.
The carpenter was called and came to the school to get the measurements for the awning structure. We agreed on a price (about $1500 equivalent in national money: Soles) and we went to Trujillo to exchange dollars. (Picture 4 shows the structure being put in place.) While there we went to a local store called Sodimac to see if they had prefabricated shelves the size we wanted. Sodimac is a Homedepot-like store which recently has come to Trujillo. While convenient it doesn’t offer a lot in terms of shelving. Nothing we could find fit the dimensions needed.  We wanted to steer clear of donating something which would just be makeshift. The units we did see were expensive and low quality.
So we began looking for plan B.  A family member recommended a young man in the town who had recently built some cabinets for a local restaurant. The young man’s name is Meikel and he works with a material he calls melamine, a kind of particle board covered in formica-like material. He could build sturdy shelves to the dimensions we wanted at less cost than the prefabricated odd-sized units we had looked at.  It did mean more footwork for us, but assured something which will endure the hard use they will receive, while adding uniformity to the classrooms.
The photos 5 and 6 show Meikel, the handy man, constructing the five shelves in our living room. It took he and his wife two days to put them together and they looked great.
Part three:  going shopping for things on the wish list.

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Math Carnival

Step right up! Come one, come all to the 7th grade Probability Carnival! The seventh grade math students have been busy as we wind down to the end of the school year. We have been in our probability unit discussing the difference between simple and compound probability. To help the concepts sink in more deeply we finished our unit with some project based learning.The students first needed to brainstorm ideas for their own games that were based on probability and not skill. From there they had to calculate and compare the theoretical and experimental probabilities of their games. What better way to test out their probability than to host a carnival for the school! The STEM Lab was filled with dice and spinners, candy and bubbles, and lots of learning. And oh boy was fun had by all!

Ms. Forrest, Middle School Teacher, 7th and 8th grade math

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Got Energy?

Our 7th graders do! This past week they have been conducting labs to see the impact of height and mass on the amount of potential energy stored in an object. Understanding that to calculate the potential energy of an object you multiply the mass times the gravitational acceleration (9.8m/s) times the height, they first isolated the height of the drop of a ball as an independent variable. They dropped a tennis ball from 50cm, 75cm, and 100cm then recorded the height of the bounce. After the collection of their data, they used their information to calculate the potential energy and analyzed their data to draw a conclusion on the impact of the height of the drop on the amount of potential energy.

Next, the 7th graders decided to isolate the mass of the object as the independent variable and designed another experiment. This time they dropped a tennis ball, ping-pong ball, and golf ball from 100 cm and measured the height of the bounce. Again, they analyzed the data, calculated the potential energy, and drew conclusions.  Their 21st Century Skills were put to the task as they thought critically, created an experiment, collaborated with their lab partners, and communicated their results! Way to go, 7th Grade!!

By: Yvette Stuewe, MS Science

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A Tradition Spanning Over 50 Years

The Eighth Grade Play is a St. John’s Tradition.  That’s right.  Our Eighth Grade Literature teacher, Mrs VB, was in the Eighth Grade Play way back when – back when our kindergarten teacher, Mrs. Cariker’s, father (Mr. Paul Koehnke) was the Eighth Grade teacher and the director.  Since 1991, Mrs. VB has been the director, and she is ready to present her 29th production – “Lost in Space and the Mortgage Due!”

Do you love the battle between Good and Evil.  This year we have it all.  A dastardly villain trying to take advantage of a poor “humble” couple – Grandpa and Grandma Humble.  A Hero – Space Cadet Bob of the 25th Century – who will save a damsel in distress.  Evillina Craven (the creature no man can resist) attempts to assist our villain, Commander Snidely Backlash, but their evil plot is thwarted when Bob’s rocket takes off.  That’s all we can share.  Come see the show on Thursday night, May 23, at 7PM in the Auditorium.  Admission is free!

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St. John’s Wins First Place in the 53rd Annual California Student Media Festival!

View award winning video by student Paul Schulteis https://youtu.be/Bm-d-onb1g8

After completing our social studies unit on Medieval Europe, students in the seventh-grade were tasked with demonstrating their understanding of the role of a medieval manor by constructing a feudal manor using Minecraft. Minecraft allows students an opportunity to work on mathematics, visual arts, storytelling and digital learning in an engaging environment. Some students gain their first experience learning how to code while others continue to hone and advance their coding ability.

Class time was given to students to design their manor. Some students used iPads and others used their laptops. Once the Minecraft design was created students then had to record a four-minute video explaining what life on a manor was like. Many students added a final touch by incorporating medieval music to their video.

The projects the students turned in this year were amazing and needed to be viewed by others.I choose to submit several student projects into the 53rd California Student Media Festival (CSMF) competition. Student Paul Schulteis ended up winning in the middle school division of Curricular Humanities. His storytelling, creativity, and technical expertise designated him as the winner of this category. Paul and his project won St. John’s $250.00 to put toward future technology school projects. Technology is evolving everyday and having a state-of-the-art STEM lab allows our students to explore, build and create so that they have an opportunity to develop a passion for science, technology, engineering and math.

By Angie Bender, Middle School Teacher

 

8th Grade History Comes Alive!

Highlights of our 8th graders trip to D.C., Gettysburg and New York.

Check out this awesome student-created video!!!

https://animoto.com/play/0kaWpWzmpCMVSWKlbigc9g

Eighth-graders got to expand the classroom walls and visit actual historical significant locations to our our nation’s’ history and government. We began our six-day trip by visiting Mount Vernon, home to George Washington. Then we got learn about the value of freedom touring Arlington National Cemetery and observe four of our own St. John students partake in the wreath laying ceremony. On day two we got to go to the Pentagon to visit the outside memorial and tour inside of the building. Our evening was filled with an awe-inspiring illuminated tour of the National Mall.

The interactive Bible museum was a favorite of our eighth-grade students. We got to walk through the stories of the Hebrew Bible and listen to the the story of how the followers of Jesus became a thriving community. Mid-week we traveled to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania to learn first-hand on how this three-day battle was the turning point of the Civil War. Next, we traveled to New York to see the Wicked Broadway Musical. Our morning tour boat allowed us to view the Statue of Liberty and experience what immigrants saw when they were arriving at Ellis Island. Meeting our walking tour guides in lower Manhattan allowed us to hear first hand how the Dutch first settled along the Hudson River in 1624. Our walking tour ended at the 9/11 Memorial Museum. On day six we were able to go to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Central Park and have lunch in Time Square and make it on time to the airport to return home Friday evening.

Angie Bender, Middle School Teacher

5th Grade at Riley’s Farm!

Last Thursday and Friday, our fifth graders were able to take part in a wonderful field trip to Riley’s Farm.  This field trip is an overnight adventure where the students are Revolutionary War soldiers.  The students get to reenact battles between the British and the colonists.  They eat rations like a colonial soldier would eat. (They also get the delicious Riley’s Farm feasts as well.)  They participate in training drills and writing with quill and ink.  They are able to actively see some of the things that the colonists may have encountered regarding the Stamp Act and other intolerable acts that took place under British rule. The fifth graders also enjoyed a rousing speech given by Patrick Henry.  The students were excited to participate in this unique hands-on learning experience.

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